Okay, I know I can’t be the only person who has fallen down the “more recommendations for you” rabbit hole. You know the one: your eye gets pulled away from your original task and three hours later you find yourself thinking, “I just wanted to buy some socks!”

Even though I usually end up spending triple the amount of time I planned, I keep clicking for more. Why? Because most of the time I get surprisingly useful recommendations. Of course, there are those few ads following me around the web like an ex who just can’t let go, but for the most part, I enjoy not having to try so hard. The internet is a big place, and it’s easy to get lost.

So when brands like stitchfix and Spotify try to make things easier for their users, I consider it a smart move to use smart-data—it’s good for their brand. Using big data in a personal way not only helps drive sales, it also helps earn loyalty from their ultra-engaged customers. As @itsashleyoh said: “Algorithms, you get me like no other.”

(Will Ashley feel the same way after seeing her overhauled Facebook feed?)

Spotify has been the data-driven campaign king in recent months with their 2016 turned 2017 campaigns, highlighting some of their most unique finds among user data.

Just make sure charming doesn’t veer into creepy. “Don’t waste a customer’s time by misusing their data, failing to protect their privacy, trying to sell them stuff they already own, and not making a real effort to treat different customers differently,” said Steve Dennis, contributor for Forbes.

Information should be used to tell your target audience why they need you or your product—like this Viber campaign that helped connect specific groups of expats with their homeland.

Or if you want to get really, really personal—only tell one person about your product, like Skittles.

Have a tailored-to-you weekend, everybody!

– Your big data, big-thinking friends at Brokaw.

Your eye gets pulled away from your original task and three hours later you find yourself thinking, “I just wanted to buy some socks!”

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