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November 22nd, 2013

Do you have the XX Factor?



Take away the bourbon and Lucky Strikes, and unfortunately, today’s advertising scene still looks a lot like Mad Men. Sure, we’ve made some great strides. With female leaders behind some of the most well-received work of our time, including MasterCard’s “Priceless” campaign, Liquid Plumr Double Impact, and Snickers’ “You’re not you when you’re hungry.” Still, women represent only 3% of creative directors in the industry today. So it’s no wonder so many brands continue to nightmarishly whiff at bat.

According to She-conomy:

  • Women represent the majority of the online market
  • Women account for 85% of all consumer purchases, including everything from autos to health care
  • Over the next decade, women will control two-thirds of consumer wealth in the United States

And yet…

  • 91% of women said that advertisers don’t understand them

So what’s the secret to marketing to women?

Let women do it.

At Brokaw, we proudly boast 58% women and 42% men. (Can you say Siskaw, anybody?)

So here’s some advice from our fiercely talented femmes on how to talk to, well, us:

  • Don’t make our gender the V.I.P information on your creative brief.
  • You’re not reaching us just by making your product pink or “lite.”
  • Show us the value of your product – we’re thoughtful before we’re decisive.

Fortunately for everyone, there are excellent organizations like The 3% Conference, Let’s Make the Industry 50/50, and SheSays to shed light on this troubling issue and provide resources not only for rising career women, but for agencies lost without a map. Because, we all know, men will never ask for one. (Zing!)

Here’s a great example to follow: a new spot quite literally building a new messaging platform for young women – demanding change in the toy industry with a progressive ad that speaks the volumes we’re all thinking. From three little girls.